Why moving to a hosted desktop service is beneficial

Moving to a Virtual Desktop environment helps unify and centralise network management for IT administrators and empowers employees to work remotely using their choice of devices. However, to migrate from a physical desktop to a virtual desktop environment can be costly and time consuming due to the hardware, software and expertise required to install and manage it. A simpler way would be to opt for a ‘Hosted Virtual Desktop service’ from a services provider and here are a few reasons why…

Reduce costs
Helps convert capital expenditure to operational expenditure, there will be some software and hardware costs but, it will be considerably less than implementing it yourself. VDI infrastructures are flexible, it can be scaled up as well as down – the service provider can add new user accounts within minutes. Desktop bandwidth consumption will also reduce as all the processing work is done at the core of the network (at the service provider’s datacentre) – so, existing WAN bandwidth will be able to support more branch users.

Manageability
It consolidates, standardised, cut hardware costs and centralise management where administrators can monitor and maintain the desktops all in one place. VDI streamlines day-to-day management, new application deployments and operation system upgrades. Choosing a hosted service means businesses will not need to worry about the management of the network, as the service provider will manage it all.

Device and Location Independence
Remote WorkingIt provides mobility to the workforce – allowing users to access corporate data and applications from any device securely and efficiently. It offers location independence so, employees can work from anywhere with an internet connection and the service provider can efficiently and effectively provide remote IT support to users. So, workers will not be tied to a physical place of work, when ‘working’ and it will assist in decreasing branch office energy costs, required desk space etc.

Flexibility
Whether it is the Cloud-Hosted option or an internal Virtual Desktop Infrastructure it offers flexibility and scalability. Virtual desktops can be added or removed with a few clicks on a global scale and monthly costs can be adjusted accordingly. Setting up new branch offices worldwide can also be done quickly using this solution. Opting for a hosted VDI, monthly costs often includes remote IT user support and any changes required you will just have to call the service provider, the monthly costs will also be adjusted accordingly to reflect the number of users, saving you time.

Security
Employees can work anywhere in a secure manner, as workers are granted access toSecure Remote Working Netshield corporate networks and all data that is amended or created is stored in a central location. This also makes disaster recovery planning simpler as it can be implemented and managed easily and promptly. Service providers will ensure all security configurations, user policies and data backup procedures are always up-to-date which all helps to lower the risk of data loss.

Conclusion
Virtual Desktops can help lower the total cost of ownership for organisations while providing a robust and scalable infrastructure. Hosted services removes the barriers to adoption and eliminates the cost and complexities of deploying and managing desktops while providing flexibility to end-users. This type of hosted service also allows SMEs, to gain competitive advantage and adopt to market changes quickly without having to worry about the IT infrastructure capacity and management.

For more information on Hosted VDI services contact Netshield today.

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Ability to work anywhere, with a virtual desktop environment (disclaimer internet required)

With technology constantly changing, maintaining the complexities of a physical desktop infrastructure can be labour-intensive and costly depending on the size of the IT estate. Employees need to work remotely, require out of hours access to corporate data and applications, increases the demands on the network. Changes in customer expectations and the era of the 24/7 marketplace also adds to the demands. So, it is necessary to review IT infrastructures regularly to ensure they are supporting the organisational needs and meeting the requirements.

Bye bye physical desktops?

One of the ways to save time and money on migrations and management is to just get rid of the desktops (not literally) and move to a ‘Virtual Desktop Infrastructure’ or VDI.
Imagine you have an estate of over 100 physical desktops and they all need to be upgraded to a new operating system, you would need to work on each desktop individually to upgrade it, taking up a lot of your time. But, if you utilise VDI technology you would only need to upgrade it in one place and deploy it to the rest of the estate.

VDI repurposes PC devices into thin clients and transforms a traditional desktop Hosted Virtual Desktopsenvironment into a low footprint virtualised environment, offering flexibility and scalability allowing employees the ability to access their desktop or corporate user account remotely, without the worry of data confidentiality or unmanaged devices on the network. It also unifies and centralises management where IT administrators can manage users and applications with ease.

Implemented internally it will require expertise in order to plan, deploy and managed the virtualised infrastructure. It would also require upfront capital expenditure for things like storage, thin clients, virtualisation software etc. Another option is to use a Cloud-Hosted Virtual Desktop environment provided by a Managed Services Provider (MSP), it will provide all the VDI benefits, but with less hassle or you could employ a provider to carry out the migration for the organisation.

For more information on VDI or Hosted Virtual Desktop services please contact us today

Let’s talk about…Windows 10

It feels like Windows 8 was only just released yesterday but it is nearly time for a new operating system to hit our devices – Windows 10. But, why jump from 8 to 10? Microsoft stated the newest version is so significant that it warrants a ‘10’, differentiating it to mark a ‘new chapter in the history of Windows’. However according to other sources, Microsoft decided to skip Windows 9 because of legacy code from third-party applications –

windows 10Cranbourne said that “early testing revealed just how many third party products had code in the form of Windows 9”, referring to benchmark operating systems Windows 95 and Windows 98. He said: “This was the pragmatic solution to avoid that.”

There was also rumours late 2014 that upgrades for Windows 7 and 8 users will be free. Terry Myerson, Microsoft’s Executive Vice President of Operating Systems confirmed at an event in January that for the first year after the launch, customers with devices running on Windows 7, Windows 8.1, or Windows Phone 8.1 will be able to upgrade to the latest version of the operating system – for free. However, those on ‘Enterprise’ versions will not be included in this offer.

Details of how this would work has not been released but, it seems that Microsoft has learnt from the previous release of Window 8 – it is not always the case of if we build it, customers will come! By providing incentives for Windows 10 uptake will help Microsoft create demand for suitable applications for the new OS.

We’re on Bizness News, Talking about Flexible Working

Flexible working Netshield

Richard Carty Netshield, on BizToBiz TV talking about ‘Flexible working’

Remote Working… The Trend of Mobility in the Workplace

Forrester Research suggests 95% of workers are using at least one-self purchased device for work, which can help explain the blurring between work and play, and the growing adoption of BYOD within businesses.

But, when it comes to Workforce Mobility, BYOD is only a part of it, as TechTarget and Computer Weekly IT priorities survey, found 67% of enterprise plan to issue employees with mobile devices such as laptops, tablets and smartphones in 2014 – suggesting that employers are also starting to see the benefits of remote working, by empowering employees with the ability to choose where they work.

Remote Working

Working anywhere, anytime…

By offering remote working or telecommuting it can remove recruitment geographic limits, employers can employ the very best and employees can work for who they want without worrying about the location of the offices – the ability to be able to work anywhere and workplace flexibility can help to attract and retain staff. With the amount of communication tools available cross-boarders conference calls can all be cost-effective.

Researchers at Stanford University found that remote workers are 13% more productive and have less sick days. The increase in productivity could be because it provides employees with the freedom of working from a personalised space, a space that can support individual workflow and processes, no compulsory commute (which can sometimes be stressful!!), a space that has no interruptions from colleagues which in turn can increase job satisfaction.

By offering employees the option for flexible working it displays trust (although there will be times where this is abused). Employees would appreciate the flexibility of tailoring their work-life balance = they would be as focused and productive. In theory. But, when working from home there may be distractions due to domestic circumstances which could have opposite effect so, its not something that is suitable for everyone.

Not everyone sees workplace mobility in a positive light – In 2013 Yahoo ended its remote working program and BestBuy quickly followed suit. Both argued employees working together within one building will promote interaction, creativity and the sharing of information – which is a valid point. This idea is supported by Google where Patrick Pichette CFO commented “The surprising question we get is: ‘How many people telecommute at Google?’ And our answer is: ‘As few as possible’”.

The lack of uptake of remote working could be that many organizations lack trust with their employees, they have an innate belief that performance and productivity can be measured within office buildings, as Managers can see physical presence – the question is, just because someone is sitting there, does it really mean they are being productive? The answer can be debatable.

Even though there is a low uptake in remote working currently, as technology and user habits change, ‘Work Mobility’ and ‘Flexible Working’ is predicted to grow. Leading to a popular view that work is something not confined to a particular building, it is an activity that can be conducted anytime, anywhere.

Of course certain jobs are not suited to remote working like manning a production line and there are a number of disadvantages. In short mobility in the workplace can be beneficial

Secure Remote Working Netshield

Working remotely? Make sure its done securely.

for businesses and individuals but, before the decision is made an assessment of suitability is required. If workplace mobility is something that is suited to different roles and organisational culture then, it must be planned, deployed and managed securely.